PSU Tier List Updated Accordng To Your Needs

Here we are with the Updated PSU Tier List. Every time we build a pc we always try to take a cheap budget friendly PSU. To reduce the budget of our build and save some bucks for other components. But Here is the deal a low grade PSU can cause a very much damage to our high valued components.

So, regarding this here are the Updated Tier List Of PSU, Sorted by your needs.

  • Tier S must have OCP, OPP, SCP, OTP, UVP, OVP, inrush current limiting, well configured multirail, independent regulation, be Half-/Full bridge and meet c6/c7 crossloads. they exceed a+ requirements and stand out from the other tier units in build quality.

  • Tier A+ is required to have OCP, OPP, SCP, OTP, UVP, OVP, inrush current limiting, well configured multirail, independent regulation, be Half-/Full bridge and meet c6/c7 crossloads.

  • Tier A is required to have OCP, OPP, SCP, OTP, UVP, OVP, inrush current limiting, independent regulation, be ACRF/Half-/Full bridge and meet c6/c7 crossloads.

  • Tier B+ is required to have OPP, SCP, OTP, UVP, OVP, inrush current limiting, independent regulation, be ACRF/Half-/Full bridge and meet c6/c7 crossloads.

  • Tier B is required to have OPP, SCP, UVP, OVP, inrush current limiting, independent regulation and meet c6/c7 crossloads.

  • Tier C is required to have OPP, SCP, UVP, OVP, inrush current limiting and meet c6/c7 crossloads.

  • Tier D+ falls slightly behind requirements, but has rather unrealistic scenarios where it’ll fail in (3.3v/5v transients, overload ripple and so on)

  • Tier D is everything that falls short of the other tier’s requirements, but can only have a potential to be dangerous in certain situations.

  • Tier E has heavily malfunctioning protections or far outdated and is not recommended to use with any modern system.

  • Ripple – Ripple is mostly the noise in DC not filtered out from the AC current. A high ripple can shorten part’s lifespan. Intel allows up to 120mV, but we prefer to keep it below 50.

  • 12V rail – The most important rail in current PSUs, mostly used by the power hungry parts like the GPU and CPU, but also part of the motherboard and part of the molex connector.

  • 5V rail – An important, but much less used rail, mostly used by storage and part of the GPU.

  • 3.3V rail – A rail that gets less and less relevant, it provides power to the RAM (though this can be 12v as well these days), chipset and M.2 drives

  • OPP (Over Power Protection) – OPP or Over Power Protection is a protection that shuts down the psu when a certain load is reached. This is generally between 120-140% of it’s advertised wattage. Intel requires this protection to be present.

  •  OCP (Over Current Protection) – OCP or Over Current Protection takes a similar role as OPP, but monitors the current more actively. It’s sometimes quicker than OPP, but both act like a failover for each other. Intel doesn’t require this protection to be present if OPP is present.

  •  SCP (Short Circuit Protection) – SCP or Short Circuit Protection kicks in whenever a low resistance is reached, stopping it from shorting further. Intel requires this protection to be present, but is sometimes also partly handled by OCP and OPP.

  •  OTP (Over Temperature Protection) – OTP or Over Temperature Protection shuts down when a certain temperature is reached, protecting the PSU from potentially melting. Intel requires this protection to be present in the recent 2.52 ATX spec, but before that it wasn’t required.

  • UVP (Under Voltage Protection) – UVP or Under Voltage Protection protects the PSU from dropping too much on voltage, allowing more current through, as OPP and OCP can’t detect this. Intel does not require this to be present, but we feel like it’s important enough to be a dealbreaker.

  •  OVP (Over Voltage Protection) – OVP or Over Voltage Protection acts similar to UVP, but works the other way around. It limits how far voltage can go up, and will shut itself down if a certain limit is reached. Intel requires it to be present.

  •  Inrush current limiting – An inrush current limiter tries to limit inrush current, the instantaneous current electronic devices draw when turned on. This is normally done with a so called NTC Thermistor.

  • Single rail – A single rail lets all the current of a voltage, in this case 12v go over a single trace or “rail” (see them as breakers in your house). This has the advantage of turning off less quickly, but does mean it allows full current to go through a single wire or connector, potentially melting or burning it before shutting down

  • Multi rail – Multi rail these days aren’t physical rails, rather they have multiple points where they measure the current (generally 2-8). it can shut down the psu earlier to protect itself, with a lower chance of burning through connectors and/or cables with a catastrophic failure.

  • Group regulation – Group regulation is the oldest way of regulation mentioned here. It regulated 5v and 12v from one coil, and 3.3v from another. It’s generally only used on cheap PSUs, and has the downside of getting out of ATX specification if the 12v is too far loaded up while the 5v isn’t.

  • Independent regulation – Independent regulation regulates 3.3, 5 and 12v all independently. It’s known in the forms of double mag amp and DC-DC. It doesn’t have the crossload problems group regulation has.

  • Double mag amp – Double mag amp is the less efficient form of independent regulation, as it needs a load to work. These are rare to see these days, as dc-dc is generally preferred.

  • DC-DC – DC-DC is the more efficient and widely used form of independent regulation. As it doesn’t need a load to work, it’s more efficient. Most units sold at the time of writing are DC-DC

  • Digital Monitoring – Monitors current and reports it to software like NZXT CAM or Corsair iCue, generally using the OCP rail to measure.

  • Digital Circuit – Analog and digital circuits at the end have one goal : transmit data and process information into other forms(sound, light, etc). Digital circuits function on two fixed signal levels, 1s and 0s(binary). This allows for better control of switching frequencies under different loads and can achieve really high efficiency, but is also much more expensive to implement

  • Double Forward – The cheapest to produce topology, it heavily relies on hard switching, and can start to whine with higher end GPUs (Vega, 1070+, 2070+)

  • ACRF (Active Clamp Reset Forward) – ACRF or Active Clamp Reset Forward is something mostly used by FSP, and it’s pretty much a more efficient way of double forward. They have a lower chance of whining, but still have a good chance on it compared to half- and full bridge.

  • Half bridge – Half Bridge configurations are usually seen in PSUs with LLC Resonant converters mostly and this circuit is used to minimize switching power losses and can be more efficient, half bridge utilities 2 fets. Half bridge is generally preferred over double forward and ACRF.

  • Full bridge – Full bridge configurations are similar to Half Bridge configs, however utilises 4 fets, lower power can be less efficient compared to half bridges, but at higher power platforms it can make quite a difference. it does generally cost the most out of the 4 topologies to produce.

  • c6/c7 crossloads – c6/c7 sleep states or “Haswell ready” connects to a sleep state used on Intel processors of 4th gen or newer. AMD has these sleep states too, but doesn’t specifically name them. most importantly it has to meet a crossload performance and that it has to be keepable to do a zero-load-power, that most group regulated units can’t meet, it’s highly recommended you pick something up for modern systems that meets this.

Tier S - Recommended if you're looking for some of the best units brought out in the recent years, generally come at a premium.
  • Antec High Current Pro Platinum
  • Cooler Master V-Platinum 2019
  • Corsair AXi 2013 - AXi 2014 - AXi 2018
  • Delta GM
Tier A+ - Recommended for high end gaming systems and workstations with multiple GPU setup.
  • BeQuiet Straight Power 11 - Dark Power Pro P10 - Dark Power Pro 11
  • Bitfenix Formula Gold - Whisper
  • Cooler Master Masterwatt maker
  • Corsair RMi - HXi - HX Platinum - AX1200 2010
  • Deepcool DQ-M
  • Enermax Platimax Digifanless - Revolution D.F
Tier A - Recommended for high end gaming systems and workstations with single GPU setup.
PSU Tier List Updated Accordng To Your Needs
  • Aerocool Project 7
  • Asus ROG Thor
  • BeQuiet SFX-L
  • Cooler Master V Semi-Modular - Masterwatt Maker MiJ - V-Gold 2013 - V-gold 2018 - V-platinum 2013
  • Corsair RMx 2015 - RMx 2018 - AX 2013 - RM 2019 - HX Gold 750w+ - TXM 2017 (Gold) - Vengeance Silver - SF Platinum - SF Gold - AX 2018
  • Cougar GX-F Aurum - GX-F
  • Enermax Platimax D.F
  • EVGA PS - G2 - P2 - T2 - GM
  • Fractal design Ion+ Platinum - Ion+ SFX Gold
  • FSP Aurum PT - Aurum Xilenser - Aurum Pro - Hydro G - Hydro G Pro - Hydro X - Hydro PT - Hydro PTM
  • Gamdias Astrape P1
  • Gigabyte ap850gm
  • Kolink Continuum
  • Mistel MX
  • NZXT E
  • Phanteks Revolt X, AMP
  • Rosewill Capstone - Lightning - Silent Night
  • Sama Armor Gold - Armor Platinum - Forza Titanium
  • Seasonic Focus GX - Focus GM - Focus PX - Focus SGX - Prime Platinum - Prime Titanium - X - XP - XP2 - XP3 - Snow Silent
  • Prime Fanless - X Fanless
  • Super Flower: Golden Green - Leadex Gold - Leadex Platinum - Leadex Titanium - Leadex II - Leadex III (-650w)
  • Thermaltake Toughpower Grand Gold - Toughpower Grand Platinum - iRGB Plus - DPS Gold - GF1
  • XFX Pro Black Edition Limited - XTS 1000w - Pro Black FM 750w+
Tier B+ - Recommended for midrange gaming systems and workstations with single GPU setup.
  • BeQuiet Pure Power 10 400w+ - Pure Power 11 400w+ - Straight Power E10
  • Cooler Master MWE Gold
  • Corsair CX 2017 - RM 2013 - CS Gold
  • Cougar: GX-S 2017
  • Deepcool DQ-ST
  • Enermax Revolution X't II
  • EVGA G+ - G1+ - GS - GQ 850w+ - GD 2017
  • FSP Dagger
  • Gigabyte GH - GX
  • Nox Hummer X Gold - GD
  • Riotoro Onyx, Engima Bronze
  • Rosewill Photon <=750w
  • SilentiumPC Supremo L2
  • Silverstone Essential Gold semi-modular - Nightjar
  • Vivo 24K
  • Xilence Performance X
Tier B - Recommended for entry level gaming systems only, preferably single PCI-e power connection on GPU, desktops intended for prolonged 24/7 usage.
  • Antec Edge - TruePower Classic
  • BR ONE Rainbow
  • BeQuiet System Power 9 400w+ - Power Zone
  • Cooler Master MWE Bronze V2 - MWE 80+ V2 - MWE Bronze V1 600w+ - Masterwatt
  • Corsair CXM 2015 - CXM 2017 - HX650 Gold - GS Bronze - Vengeance Bronze, CX 2012 750w+ - CXM 2012 750w+
  • Cougar LX
  • Deepcool Quanta
  • Enermax Revolution X't
  • EVGA B2 - G5 <1000w - GD 2019 - GQ <=750w
  • Fractal Design Integra M
  • FSP Raider II
  • Gigabyte P650H
  • Lian Li SFX-L
  • Rosewill Capstone G - Quark - Tachyon - Photon 850w+
  • Seasonic S12G - G
  • Super Flower Leadex Silver - Eco Silver
  • Thermaltake BlueEvo 2.0 - Toughpower Grand RGB - Smart Pro RGB
  • XFX Pro XXX - Pro XTR - Pro Black FM 750w - TS Gold
  • Xilence Performance A+
  • Zalman EBT
Tier C - Recommended for entry level desktops, low profile HTPCs, Office desktops, preferably GPUs with no external PCI-e power connection.
  • BeQuiet Pure Power 10 <400w - Pure Power 11 <400w - Straight Power E9
  • Bitfenix Fury
  • Cooler Master GM - GX Storm - MWE Bronze V1<600w
  • Cougar STX - VTX
  • Corsair CX 2012 <=600w - CXM 2012 <=600w - VS 2017
  • EVGA BQ - G1 - NEX Gold
  • Fractal Design Tesla R2
  • FSP Raider - Aurum 92+ - Aurum CM - Hydro GE - Hexa 85+
  • Gigabyte BH, PB500
  • NOX Urano TX - Urano VTX
  • OCZ ModXStream Pro
  • Rosewill Glacier - Fortress - TFX Bronze - TFX Gold
  • Seasonic S12iii
  • Silverstone SFX Bronze except V3
  • Thermaltake Paris
Tier D+ - Potentially dangerous, but only in rather unrealistic situations
  • Asus ROG Strix
  • Antec Earthwatts Pro Gold - Earthwatts Pro Platinum - High Current Gamer Gold - Neo Eco Gold
  • EVGA G3 - G5 1000w
  • Enermax Revolution SFX
  • FSP Dagger Pro
  • Riotoro Enigma G2
  • Seasonic Focus FX - Focus Plus FX
  • Silverstone SFX gold - Strider Gold Evo - Gold Evolution - Strider Gold S
  • Superflower Leadex III 650w
Tier D - Potentially dangerous, but only in specific situations
  • Antec Earthwatts - EA Green - Neo ECO - Basiq VP - Basiq BP - Basiq VP-F - High Current Gamer Bronze
  • BeQuiet Pure Power L9 - Pure Power L8
  • Bitfenix BPA
  • Cooler Master Masterwatt Lite
  • EVGA W1 - BT
  • Enermax NaXn 82+
  • FSP Hexa - Hyper - Hammer
  • Fractal Design Integra R2
  • Rosewill Hive S - Arc - Arc M
  • Seasonic S12ii - M12ii - M12ii Evo
  • Silverstone SFX Bronze 3.0 - Strider Essential Bronze
  • Thermaltake London - Toughpower - Smart 80+ - TR2 - Smart M
  • XFX XT - TS Bronze - ProSeries Bronze - Core
  • Xilence Performance C
  • Zalman GS - GT
Tier E - Dangerous in multiple scenarios
  • BR ONE BR-X
  • Chieftec Non-rated units
  • Corsair VS 2012
  • Cooler Master Elite - Realpower - B2
  • Diablotek All units
  • EVGA N1 - N2
  • L-C Power All units
  • Lepa Non-rated units
  • Linkworld All units
  • Logisys All units
  • MS-Tech All units
  • Raidmax Non-rated units
  • Rasurbo All units
  • Rhomburtech All units
  • Sempre All units
  • Speedlink All units
  • Tacens All units
  • Thermaltake Litepower
  • Trust All units
  • Ultron All units

Credits - Linus Tech Forums

Hit Me Up in the comments if i missed something.

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  • 1
  •  
  •  
  •  
    1
    Share